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Comments by marian spath on Thursday, June 12, 2003 at 09:59 IP Logged
Thank you for a wonderfully-written, informative book about a fascinating subject! Marian S.
Eugene, OR USA

Comments by Tommy Williams on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 at 08:29 IP Logged
Thanks Ms. Hillenbrand for such a wonderful read. I've just finished and was ready to gush with superlatives but after reading from some of the other well-wishers I realized it's all been said! You've made it such a personal experience for so many. One person said it made them cry with both tears of sorrow and joy. That really captures it. Your ability to tell a story such heart & soul and bring the reader in the moment is what I hope for, but seldom get, when I read fiction! I've never encountered such rich textures and colors of voice in a nonfictional account. This story would have never reached the big screen again without your interpretation. Glad you're advising. Thanks again and best of luck. Tommy Williams
Nashville, TN USA

Comments by Jeff Kula on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 at 06:46 IP Logged
Dear Ms. Hillenbrand: I greatly enjoyed your book and the current documentary and eagerly anticipate the movie. You did a great job. I read it cover to cover! However, I was saddened to hear about your ongoing ordeal with CFS. I am a veterinarian and do not propose to contradict or in any way confuse the issue of your condition. Having said that, I do know of a safe nutraceutical compound that has made a great difference in CFS and fibromyalgia which in some aspects have some great similarities. I believe that I have a moral obligation to make you aware of a simple yet elegant supplement that could dramatically improve your quality of life. I just learned of this compound two years ago at the AVMA convention. Like many vets and docs out of school for several years, I had never heard of Transfer Factor although it was discovered in 1949 and represents a major health breakthrough. Over 3,000 actual research studies have been conducted on it and now it is available to the general public. Well, what can Transfer Factor do for your heatlh? It has been found that TF as a less than 2% extract of Grade A dairy cow colostrum (first milk) has the ability to condition and coordinate the immune systems of all higher species. In this case, taking TF as a concentrate in daily capsule form can re-establish your immune system. A Dr. Bill Hennen, Ph.D in bio-organic chemistry and immunology, has studied the effect of immune suppression on the progression of chronic diseases and has found that many with CFS or fibromyalgia have measurably suppressed immune responses. If we just measure by Natural Killer Cell activity (NK Cells are the nightwatchmen of our immune defenses), people with a history as you described in your book characteristically have a traumatic event that causes the neuro-endocrine axis to suppress the immune system. When the initial offending event occurs the immune system is shocked and greatly dampened and it never fully recovers normal function. Transfer Factor available from 4-Life Research can restore that function and well-being. TF acts as a tutoring molecule that helps the immune system do its 4R's: 1)Recognize a threat, 2)Respond appropriately to that threat, 3) Relax the immune response once the threat is vanquished and, 4) Remember the threat for future reference. Transfer Factors are imbedded memory in your immune system that prevents you from having to go through repeated bouts with something as common as chicken pox once you have had childhood exposure. It's the immune system's shorthand, if you will. In your case with the food poisoning episode years ago, it is quite possible that your system in dealing with that threat was just overwhelmed. What often happens is that normally quiescent viral infections like Epstein-Barr or chlamydia can flourish at this particular time. Then, the immune system rather than recognizing this invasion allows a stalemate to persist. Being also responsible for tissue repair and cell turnover the immune system doesn't 'take out the garbage' like it should and toxicity at the cell level can occur over time. Thus, you have low energy, 'bad days', vertigo, etc. all of which could be related to the underlying dysfunction of your immune system to protect and repair. Our health is no better than the competence of our immune defenses. Drug therapy can only augment or manipulate that foundation. By supporting your immune system platform, one can expect better health in many respects. If you would like more information, I would be happy to send along (free of charge or obligation) hard copies of literature reviews (real science, not junk,from the National Institutes of Health) by Dr. Hennen on the subject. The product is not expensive and its safety profile was meant for infants. Whether you ever order product is not my main concern. My concern is your health and well-being. Dr. Hennen's program using TF has helped thousands in the past 4 years. I truly think Transfer Factor could help you immensely and recommend it to you as if you were a close family member of mine. From a true 'fan', Sincerely, Jeff Kula, DVM 636-933-0911
Festus, MO USA

Comments by Holly Shick on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 at 03:30 IP Logged
Dear Ms. Hillenbrand: I loved your book! You are such an amazing talent. The fact that you gathered so many historical facts surrounding Seabiscuit and the people who surrounded him, and manage to make the reader feel like he or she is right there watching the race is absolutely incredible. I could not put the book down - it's simply fabulous! Thank you for writing such a wonderful story, one I had not heard of before your book. I've also just bought the collector's edition, which is equally amazing! The pictures you chose truly bring the book to life. On another note, you may remember me from the Tenley library WHS adoption event where you adopted Vinnie, my former foster. I had no idea who you were that day until someone told me later on! I hope Vinnie is doing well - sounds like he is, as I saw the 4/27 edition of the Washington Post Magazine. I'd love to hear about him if you have time to write. Thank you again for your wonderful story! Best regards, Holly Shick
Washington, DC USA

Comments by Andrew Ballard on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 at 02:59 IP Logged
Please e-mail regarding appearances and events. We would like to extend an invitation to an upcomming event in Atlanta related to your work.
Atlanta, GA USA

Comments by Sharon Cathcart on Wednesday, June 11, 2003 at 01:37 IP Logged
Dear Ms. Hillenbrand: Thank you so much for writing this wonderful story about a track legend. My mom would tell me stories about Seabiscuit when I was a little girl, and I'd seen the Shirley Temple film. Your book brought the racing world alive for me in the story of the little horse who became a hero. Thank you so much for making Seabiscuit real for me ... I cried during the book more than once, and I'm sure there will be tears when I view the film. You have made Seabiscuit a friend to and a hero of a new generation, and I commend you.
San Jose, CA USA

Comments by Barbara Kuttler on Monday, June 09, 2003 at 06:00 IP Logged
Our book group discussed this last week, and we all loved the book! It's a seniors group, so many had stories of the horses they loved growing up on the farm in their youth. One question/comment though: it must have been a conscious decision on the part of the author to downplay the gambling aspect of horseracing. You make occasional references to odds, but don't reveal them. The race Red Pollard had Charles Howard put $200 down on Seabiscuit to win (then CH added $25,000 for himself) really had us curious as to the final odds, to figure out how much CH made on that race on the side! We know the movie can't be nearly as good as the book, for all its detail and poetic language, but we are looking forward to seeing it, too. Never would have believed I'd enjoy a 300+ page book about a horse so much, but you wrote it in such fascinating, storyteller fashion. Thank you.
Davenport, IA USA

Comments by Greg on Monday, June 09, 2003 at 01:30 IP Logged
Laura, the Collector's Edition is gorgeous! It belongs with artworks displayed under special tracklights. Your choice of photos and the way they are cropped and framed are first class. Your sensitivity and love for Pops show clearly from cover to cover, and your taste is impeccable. I'm already a huge fan, and you amaze even me!
Albuquerque, NM USA

Comments by Norma Wood on Monday, June 09, 2003 at 00:43 IP Logged
Enjoyed your book very much. I first knew Seabiscuit when he came to Pimilco Races for the Preakness. That was in 1936 and I was ll years old. It was the grat depression and Seabiscuit gave the people something else to think about and I have never forgotten this wonderful horse. He was my Hero.
Baltimore, Md USA

Comments by Janet Roy on Saturday, June 07, 2003 at 07:33 IP Logged
I bought this book and know I will love it. My husband and I had the honor of appearing in the SEABISCUIT movie that is to be released July 25th. We spent a very cold November day at Keeneland (better known as Pimlico) but I would not have wanted it any other way. I had tears in my eyes when I thought about what we were filming. A tribute to an historical event.
Florence, KY USA

Comments by Mark O'Kennon on Friday, June 06, 2003 at 01:28 IP Logged
Hello Laura.. I completely enjoyed reading your book. A truly amazing story. I could not put it down and didn't, I read it in a day. My father grew up in San Mateo,Ca and spent much of his boyhood and adult life at both Tanforan and Bay Meadows. He as I share your passion for the horses. He would always tell me stories about those days and I felt he was with me as i turned every page. Late in life he began making wooden carvings of horses heads that had won the Kentucky Derby and mounting them on a wooden backboard. The detail is amazing. He had done them all up to 1996 when he passed away. An article was written about him in the San Mateo Times. I would like to send you a copy of the article and a picture of his carvings for you to enjoy. Is there an address where I can send them ? They do not have to be returned. I hope that you will allow me to. Again many,many thanks for the book from both me and my father. Mark & Michael O'Kennon
Fremont, Ca USA

Comments by Donald c. Gilbert Jr. on Friday, June 06, 2003 at 00:51 IP Logged
Dear laura, I have to admit i havent read your book. i plan to now. i didnt know anything about seabuit till i saw the movie poster at work. That is why i am writng you. I am the asst. manager at Peachtree 8 Cinemas here in columbus, ga. I was wondering where i could get some stuff about seabiscuit. i really want to promote this movie, big time. i really dont want the same old promotional stuff the studios send out. I want this movie to do good here. Some people are already talking about how boring it looks from the preview. I'm excitied. PLease can you help me out where i can get some pictures, newspapers articles, what ever you can help me with. i want too put them up before the movie comes, and get people ready and excitied as i am. thank you so much for any help you can give. Donald.c Gilbert Jr. % Peachtree 8 Cinemas 3131 Manchester Exp. Columbus, Ga. 31909
Columbus, Ga. USA

Comments by Alicia on Friday, June 06, 2003 at 00:24 IP Logged
I have to admit that until last year I knew very little about the horse. While attending the funeral of my husbands grandfather people spoke of him the last living person to have ridden Seabisquit. I was intrigued that no one had mentioned it before. Lucky for his great grandchildren he had written his memoirs and it includes his opportunity to ride the famous horse. He does say that he wishes he would have seen the value of the horse and taken a couple of his own pictures with him.
Ukiah, Ca USA

Comments by dave kerlin on Thursday, June 05, 2003 at 01:45 IP Logged
Laura, i brought your new special collectors edition with all the new pictures. I'm glad you decided to do this. You had mentioned you were working on it a few months ago. I also brought the new paperback with the seabiscuit picture from the movie. I guess I must have 4 seabiscuit books now. I am even building a seabiscuit scrapbook. I was thrilled when the tv guide in the washington post had seabiscuit on the front. I sent away for the pbs documentary. Since I have read about seabiscuit, I have had a renewed interest in horseracing. I am sure other people are like me. Keep up your work.
germantown, md USA

Comments by Kim on Tuesday, June 03, 2003 at 02:07 IP Logged
Laura, I just bought your book for my dad for father's day. He is retired and active in Thoroughbred racing. It would be the most special gift if I could have you sign it. Since you're in DC- any chance I could meet/drop by? If too imposing, can I overnight it w/return postage for quick return? Please let me know. I would be grateful. Kim
McLean, VA USA

Comments by Harry Schier on Monday, June 02, 2003 at 06:08 IP Logged
I've just finished your book a second time. I had an interesting reaction (to me, anyway--you be the judge)both times: a feeling of gratitude, like when you're floating above the snow-coated pines in a ski-lift on a brilliant March day or listening to, say, James Taylor in concert singing The Frozen Man. Thank you for enriching our lives - Harry Schier
Rapid City, SD USA

Comments by Pat H. Mooney on Sunday, June 01, 2003 at 03:45 IP Logged
I just want to add my praise to everyone else for your wonderful book, I only hope that the movie does justice to it because I'm sure it's a treasured experience for everone who reads it. My own connection with thoroughbred racing is tenuous at best and then only as a spectator and bettor and that only at Louisiana tracks. Back when I was going to the track, there was a saying to the effect that there's honest racing, crooked racing, and Louisiana racing. Make of that what you will; considering the ways some of the nags I bet on (nothing anywhere near the caliber of Seabiscuit, I assure you)lost, I at least accept the saying. Anyway, I do have a question and a comment. What is the Selima Room? It's mentioned in your footnotes but nowhere could I find it in the text. I'm guessing that it had something to do with Molino Rojo but I could be wrong and, as I said, I couldn't find it. As to the comment, I was reading the guestbook and found references to your CFS. Didn't know what that was so I checked WebMd and now I know. I am sincerely sorry for your illness and wish you a complete and full remission if a recovery is not possible (And I was given to understand that recovery is possible). Any illness is a bad thing; one that hinders a creative voice such as yours affects all of us, even those with our own, different set of initials with which we must contend. Mine are CP, by the way, but I'm used to them and would rather have them than yours. Thanks for reading! Pat
Houston, TX USA

Comments by Brendagale Beasley on Sunday, June 01, 2003 at 00:02 IP Logged
Hi Laura, I heard an interview w/you on NPR this morning. You mentioned a book about Gettysburg that everyone should read. Please tell me the title as I didn't catch it. Congratulations on the success of your book! Brendagale
Murfreesboro, TN USA

Comments by Christine Tutcher on Saturday, May 31, 2003 at 03:18 IP Logged
What a great book! With every chapter, I felt as if I was actually there for every event. Looking forward to the movie and I hope it remains true to your book. Thank you so much for all your efforts in writing this inspirational story about Seabiscuit, Charles Howard, Tom Smith and Red Pollard. I'm recommending this book to anyone and everyone.
Tampa, FL USA

Comments by Sandra Daus on Friday, May 30, 2003 at 08:47 IP Logged
I wondered if I mailed my book to you and covered return postage, would you be so kind as to sign it? I recently purchased it from the Kentucky Horse Farm. I understand your limitations with book signings and appearances and if there have been many of these requests, I understand. It would mean so much more to me, considering your personal struggle, to have it signed. Hopefully, someone will email me. Thank you. You are a courageous woman.
St. Louis, MO USA

Comments by Laura Kallock on Friday, May 30, 2003 at 04:08 IP Logged
Please send/add a thought to the memory of John M. 'Red' Pollard at www.findagrave.com Let us never forget him
Cranston, RI USA

Comments by Tom Martin on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 07:14 IP Logged
I just have to say that I am 46 years old and there were parts of this book that made me feel absolutely giddy. You have done a fantastic job with a story that should be required reading for anyone who sets their sights too low in life. I can't wait for my friends and family to read it too!!
Mahomet, IL USA

Comments by brian loftus on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 05:14 IP Logged
i've been a horse racing fan (bettor) since the early 80's yet have never been a fan of the history of racing until now, thank you. not only was your book rivetting, it also gave me a deeper insight to the inner workings of horse, trainer, and jockey. it showed how self rightous and stubborn racing officials were (and still are). between holding the truth blind to the public and the enormous takes, have lead to the demise of horse racings popularity. the fact remains that sports are fueled by betting and there are better bets out there nowadays. I truely believe if fans felt they were getting a fair shake on the percent of their dollar and the outcome of the event, they would bring the sport back to its glory days. with just a little knowlege of the game there is nothing more exciting than a horse race (your book will inform the uninformed of this). besides who would'nt want to root for a sport where money earned is based soley on the players success, and in the case of the horse, may only earn a sugar cube. whereas, todays atheletes earn millions for crying, crimes, and sitting on the bench. your book could catapult the sport back to greatness, if only the "powers that be" would read it, get over their egos and do something about it. thank you for two days of reading bliss.
costa mesa, ca USA

Comments by brian loftus on Wednesday, May 28, 2003 at 04:27 IP Logged
i've been a horse racing fan (bettor) since the early 80's yet have never been a fan of the history of racing until now, thank you. not only was your book rivetting, it also gave me a deeper insight to the inner workings of horse, trainer, and jockey. it showed how self rightous and stubborn racing officials were (and still are). between holding the truth blind to the public and the enormous takes, have lead to the demise of horse racings popularity. the fact remains that sports are fueled by betting and there are better bets out there nowadays. I truely believe if fans felt they were getting a fair shake on the percent of their dollar and the outcome of the event, they would bring the sport back to its glory days. with just a little knowlege of the game there is nothing more exciting than a horse race (your book will inform the uninformed of this). besides who would'nt want to root for a sport where money earned is based soley on the players success, and in the case of the horse, may only earn a sugar cube. whereas, todays atheletes earn millions for crying, crimes, and sitting on the bench. your book could catapult the sport back to greatness, if only the "powers that be" would read it, get over their egos and do something about it. thank you for two days of reading bliss.
costa mesa, ca USA

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