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Comments by Larry B.Williams,Jr on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 08:55 IP Logged
That Story was one of the greatest in American History.And i have never seen a Horse that went on to be an american Icon,Movie Star,Radio Personality,Horse,Spokesperson from every thing from Hats to Cars.Just think about the way that horse would ride like the wind.And how at the time this was the "great depression"and not only did Seabisket help heal America but also the whole World.
Sanfrancisco, Ca USA

Comments by Doris Robbins on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 07:45 IP Logged
Dear Ms. Hillenbrand. I have just finished re-reading 'Seabiscuit' and appreciate what an excellent narrative it is. Even if one knew nothing of horses, racetracks, and the people who love them,your book makes the reader part of the drama and romance. I became a friend and neighbor of Marcella ( Howard ) Fenton in the 1960's and was constantly reminded of the 'charmed Cinderella' lives of the Zabala sisters. Is there a possibility their stories could become material in your capable hands? Our family looks forward to the 'Seabiscuit' movie and hopes it enjoys the great success it deserves. Thank you again for an excellent read. Sincerely, Doris Robbins
Port Orchard , WA USA

Comments by Bobby on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 07:39 IP Logged
Hi Laura, My compliments on a very informative and well-done documentary on America's racehorse Seabiscuit. One of the things I liked about this story was the describing of Seabiscuit's nature--sort of a free spirit and non-conformist, something a lot of us can identify with. The other part I liked was at the end of the match race with War Admirial when Seabiscuit's owner said "see, I told you so, my horse just made that horse a rear admiral!" If there ever was a champion 'darkhorse', Seabiscuit was it! Truly an inspiration for all of us. Best, Bob Covarrubias
San Diego, CA USA

Comments by Doris Robbins on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 07:32 IP Logged
Dear Ms. Hillenbrand,
Port Orchard , WA USA

Comments by Bobby on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 07:31 IP Logged
Hi Laura, My compliments on a very informative and well-done documentary on America's racehorse Seabiscuit. One of the things I liked about this story was the describing of Seabiscuit's nature--sort of a free spirit and non-conformist, something a lot of us can identify with. The other part I liked was at the end of the match race with War Admirial when Seabiscuit's owner said "see, I told you so, my horse just made that horse a rear admiral!" If there ever was a champion 'darkhorse', Seabiscuit was it! Truly an inspiration for all of us. Best, Bob Covarrubias
San Diego, CA USA

Comments by Christopher Neary on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 05:24 IP Logged
I enjoyed the PBS Documentary last night and I am looking forward to the book. I was brought up on the ranch adjoining Ridgewood Ranch owned by Charles Howard and where Seabiscuit retired. Growing up I heard alot about Seabiscuit but could never quite understand why. I looked in the Almanac and saw that Seabiscuit never won the Kentucky Derby or any race listed int the Almanac. I thought that maybe Seabiscuit was talked about because of a move made before I was born. Then I read Seabuiscuit: An American Legend. I consider one of the best books I have ever read. For one thing it answered by question as to what the big deal was with Seabuiscuit. For another, it was so well written that I could hardly wait until I got to the part about the race with War Admiral. I don't know if it was the writing that made the book so good, or the fact that it is such a great legend--or both. It is one story that I find inspiring. At my age, I am inspired by less and less. It is refreshing to be so taken by this story. Ever since I was a little boy in the early 1950's I have heard speculation as to where on Ridgewood that Seabiscuit is burried. Nobody seems to know. This story confirms that maybe he is still alive---in our imagination at the very least.
Willits, Ca USA

Comments by Christopher Neary on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 05:18 IP Logged
I enjoyed the PBS Documentary last night and I am looking forward to the book. I was brought up on the ranch adjoining Ridgewood Ranch owned by Charles Howard and where Seabiscuit retired. Growing up I heard alot about Seabiscuit but could never quite understand why. I looked in the Almanac and saw that Seabiscuit never won the Kentucky Derby or any race listed int the Almanac. I thought that maybe Seabiscuit was talked about because of a move made before I was born. Then I read Seabuiscuit: An American Legend. I consider one of the best books I have ever read. For one thing it answered by question as to what the big deal was with Seabuiscuit. For another, it was so well written that I could hardly wait until I got to the part about the race with War Admiral. I don't know if it was the writing that made the book so good, or the fact that it is such a great legend--or both. It is one story that I find inspiring. At my age, I am inspired by less and less. It is refreshing to be so taken by this story. Ever since I was a little boy in the early 1950's I have heard speculation as to where on Ridgewood that Seabiscuit is burried. Nobody seems to know. This story confirms that maybe he is still alive---in our imagination at the very least.
Willits, Ca USA

Comments by CHARLES CRANGLE on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 04:07 IP Logged
YOU HAVE MADE ME LOOK GREAT IN THE EYES OF MY FRIENDS AND FAMILY BECAUSE I RECOMMENDED YOUR BOOK...AND THEY ALL ENJOYED THIS REAL AMERICAN STORY. THANKS FOR MAKING ME LOOK GOOD TO THE PEOPLE I CARE ABOUT.
WASHINGTON, DC USA

Comments by Joe Kieras on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:43 IP Logged
Laura, The first time in my adult life that I heard the name “Seabiscuit” was about 6 weeks ago when my vet walked onto the horse ranch in Agua Dulce, California, where I board my two horses and asked if any of the newborn foals there (there's 8 of them) were bay colored. He explained to me that he had been approached by some movie people and was tasked to help search for a foal that could “play” the Seabiscuit foal part in your upcoming movie about Seabiscuit. Somewhere in my collective memory the forgotten name “Seabiscuit” instantly arose to the surface of my mind and correlated with the faint recollections of a famous horse that I had once, long ago, heard of somewhere in my childhood (I grew up in the 60’s and 70’s). My response to the vet’s inquiry was “COOL ! ”. Unfortunately, none of the foals in my barn matched what he was looking for. Subsequently, with my interest peaked, I went to the internet to do a search on “Seabiscuit” to see what was up with this new movie and to quench my newly born thirst for more knowledge of Seabiscuit. I found your website. I was intrigued, as all horse lovers will be, to learn more about Seabiscuit and to discover that you had written a book about him. I then bought your book a few weeks ago, and finished reading it the day that the PBS special was aired (yesterday). The PBS special was fascinating in that I got to see Seabiscuit in action, in his glory, and all of the people I had just read about. Your revealing book made me fall in love with Seabiscuit. I found myself in tears many times as I read your most excellently written story of that incredible horse with the largest of hearts, and the special people who surrounded him and loved him. Now, when I spend time with my two horses, a 15 year old thoroughbred Arab mare and a young 5 year old Thoroughbred mare ex-race horse that I just acquired last November, I almost feel like I’m back in the 1930’s era of time when horses were special to everyone, because I have a big heart for horses. That’s how much your book touched my soul. When I read the Acknowledgements section of your book I was very very surprised to find a personal connection between my ex-race horse, “Faded Memory”, and the story of Seabiscuit…I learned that A.G. Vanderbilt Jr., the man who orchestrated the match race between Seabiscuit and War Admiral at his Pimlico race track actually owned the Great Great Grandfather of my horse (Faded Memory)...the very famous Native Dancer! I recently learned of my horse’s relationship to Native Dancer (my horse is BIG, 16.3 hands, and she looks like Native Dancer) when I paid the Jockey Club to do a tatoo research on my horse’s tatoo number (she only raced in four races, and only won $577...she had a crummy trainer), but not knowing much about Thoroughbred racing history, I didn’t know that Vanderbilt owned Native Dancer. Wow! What a small world it is when it comes to thoroughbreds. Needless to say, I will be anxiously waiting for the movie to open this summer. In the meantime, I’ll continue to train my sweetheart of an ex-race horse (her nickname is “Spice”) to NOT run like she’s in a race when she’s around other horses on a trail ride and dump me off in a flying heap when she comes to a very abrupt stop at the end of her own little personal race (luckily I didn’t get hurt), and I plan on making a pilgrimage to Santa Anita race track soon (I’ve never been there even though I’ve lived not far from it for 16 years) to visit the statues of Seabiscuit and Woolf and imagine in my mind Pollard and Woolf riding Seabiscuit and hearing the roars of the crowds at the "Hunert Granders". I only wish that I could visit Seabiscuit. Thank you so much for your gift to us in writing about Seabiscuit’s story. If you ever come to L.A., please let me know so that I can ask you to sign my book, and I’d love to invite you to visit my horses and their horse ranch home in Agua Dulce! Joe Kieras
Long Beach, CA USA

Comments by Melda Lara on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:41 IP Logged
Dear Laura, I watched the PBS presentation on Seabiscuit last night, and enjoyed it immensely. I always knew there was a legend about the horse, but I did not know it was so dramatic. Thank you for presenting a heartfelt story of a courageous horse and his equally outstanding jockey. The Pollard family has much to be proud of.
Fullerton, CA USA

Comments by cynthia leask on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:33 IP Logged
Dear Laura, As a great-granddaughter of Charles Howard, I am so glad to see that you have brought him back to be recognized once again. Last night I watched the PBS story of Seabiscuit. I cried as I always have, because it is such a wonderful story. It has always brought my family much pleasure having it as our heritage. I am pleased that his story intrigued you, because you gave him new life. Job well done! Thank-you. Best Wishes, Cynthia
medford, or USA

Comments by LeAnna on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:23 IP Logged
The PBS showing was GREAT! I thought you were an older gal...oops! I have more faith in the future and the younger generation now that YOU HAVE CAPTURED A MOMENT-IN-TIME THAT WASN'T IN YOUR TIME! Good for you...and thanks for rekindling the SPIRIT of SEABISCUIT!
Willits, CA USA

Comments by Bill Lathrop on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:21 IP Logged
Hi Laura I enjoyed the PBS special very much. You commentary was great. Can't wait for the movie. Hope you are feeling well. Thanks for this great lierary work. Bill Lathrop
Mountlake Terrace, WA USA

Comments by D.H. Grummett on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:20 IP Logged
I first read your book in July of 01 and am still at a loss to explain how Seabiscuit has captured my imagination so completely, even given your wonderful skill in telling the story. Last night I saw the PBS special on him and was so thrilled to actually get to see him in moving film - not only the racing, which was amazing, but just him. I, of course am now re-reading the book and enjoying it more this time, because I know all of the characters a bit now. The one piece of the story that saddens me, I guess because I cannot understand the motive, is the manner in which Mr. Howard chose to bury Seabiscuit. It just seems it would have been much more fitting to honor him by burial in a public place and manner so that his many admirers could honor him with a visit if they wished. I hope to some day hear you explain, if you know more about it, why Seabuscuit was buried in an anonymous place.
USA

Comments by Denise Cabral on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 03:14 IP Logged
Dear Laura, My daughter and I truly enjoyed watching SeaBiscuit last night on PBS. My daughter is an equestrian rider and has her own horse. She has been riding for 5yrs. We absolutely loved the movie. We cannot wait for the Movie to hit the big screen. Thank you for making the documentary. I am going to get the book for her birthday. Do you know if Breyer horses makes SeaBiscuit ? My daughter is a huge collector of Breyer horses and is going to be looking for SeaBiscuit. Great story !!!! Thanks again - Denise
Smithfield, RI USA

Comments by Rick on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 02:55 IP Logged
Laura, last night, I was intorduced to one of ther greatest horses I have ever seen, thank you. Seabiscuit again captured the hearts of American's, over sixty years laterI am looking forward to reading your book, thanks again.
Pasadena, CA USA

Comments by john m polhamus on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 02:48 IP Logged
I'm reading the book during my morning commute, and it makes me want to stay on the bus and skip work. What a wonderfully evocotive book it is, capturing the times perfectly. Like a good race, I'm on the edge of my seat. My hat off to Ms Hillenbrand, and my only hope is that the movie is as good as the book. What a wonderful piece of work!
GLASSBORO, nj USA

Comments by Nick Campbell on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 02:09 IP Logged
Dear Laura: I saw a documentary last night about Seabisquit, during which your book was mentioned. I'd love to read this book? Can I order it directly from you? I was so fascinated by Seabisquit's story. I remember the horse, of course, from talk in the 50s, and I think I remember an episode from "Our Gang" in which they made reference to Seabisquit. Please let me know if I can order the book through you. (I would like it signed if that is appropropriate for me to ask?). Sincerely, Nicholas Campbell
Atascadero, CA USA

Comments by Rick Whittlesey on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 02:08 IP Logged
Laura, I coach a swim team in San Antonio. Our unofficial mascot this season has been Seabiscuit. The kids are learning that sheer determination beats everything. We are all going to see the movie when it is released. Thanks for your good work. -Rick Whittlesey
San Antonio, TX USA

Comments by Barbara Gifford on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 02:05 IP Logged
My husband, daughter, and I just finished viewing "The American Experience" documentary on Seabiscuit. It was excellent! All three of us have read and loved your book. It was thrilling to watch the races and see the footage of Seabiscuit and the people in his life. My dad was a big fan of racing and we often went to Bay Meadows, Golden Gate Fields, and Pleasanton Fairgrounds meetings. My first trip out of the country was to Agua Caliente when I was three! Reading and seeing "Seabiscuit" has brought back many memories. Thank you!
Fremont, CA USA

Comments by Audrey B. on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 01:20 IP Logged
When my kid brother was given a stick horse for his birthday, our dad told him to name the horse SeaBiscuit. We had never nheard of such a name, and now 5 years later I see a documentary on TV describing a horse by the same name. I now am a huge fan of Seabiscuit, and wish more people of young generations, such as myself new of such a legacy.
USA

Comments by Bill Evans on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 01:08 IP Logged
Watched the PBS Special, yesterday evening. What a fabulous and heartwarming story!! As a child I owned a Seabiscuit Board Game, and over the years, I'd mentioned the name of that horse to many people. But in the past 15 or 20 years, it seemed, fewer and fewer people remembered. Now, thanks to your efforts, the story of that valiant horse is alive, once again. Thanks to your efforts, my children, and theirs, and all our future generations will know the name, Seabiscuit. Thanks You, Laura !! Bill Evans
Sierra Vista, az USA

Comments by Raymond G Greene on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 00:45 IP Logged
Hello Laura, I am writing you a note to say how much I enjoyed your book and that I am a nephew of Red and Agnes. My mother was Alice Conlon, sister to Agnes. My two sisters and I lived with them ( I think thier son was named Mike, but we called Norah "Patty" If I remember, I was very young, about five I think. We had fallen on tough times, my father Raymond Greene, although a graduate of Boston College and a Deputy Sheriff of the Charles St jail, managed to about drink himself to death. My mother managed to hold the family together working as a legal secretary in Boston. She died a few days short of her 88th birthday two years ago. Well enough of my rambling, again my compliments on a terrific book, not just about uncle Red, but about horse racing in that era. If it is possible, I would love to email Norah, if you had that information I would greatly appreciate it. Regards, Ray Greene
Essex, MA USA

Comments by Teresa Horning on Tuesday, April 22, 2003 at 00:44 IP Logged
Ms. Hillenbrand: Last evening, my husband & I watched "American Experiance" on our local PBS station. It featured the Seabisciut story which was one of the most fasinating tales of my childhood. I rode with my cousin in various local horse shows for 4-H and my father would fill our heads & hearts about wonderful stories of Seabiscuit. Thank-you for immortalizing him!!
USA

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